Fudd-Ed

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Information - Fudd-Ed

GenreGraphics - Picture EditingYear
Language[unknown]PublisherOcean Software
Developer[n/a]Distributor-
ControlsMouseCountryUnited Kingdom
Box / InstructionsEnglishSoftwareEnglish
Programmer(s)

Brandwood, John [Elmer Fudd]

LicenseUnreleased
SerialST TypeST, STe / 0.5MB
ResolutionLowNumber of Disks1 / Double-Sided / HD Installable
Dumpdownload atari Fudd-Ed Download / MSAMIDI
Protection

Additional Comments - Fudd-Ed

Instructions - Fudd-Ed

         ELMER'S ATARI ST MAP EDITOR (EDMAP) VERSION 1.10

                    VERY CRYPTIC INSTRUCTIONS
1.0  WHAT YOU GET FOR YOUR MONEY

          This  editor  is  designed for creating maps  of  up  to 
     256x256 blocks,  from a set of 256 blocks,  each block  16x16 
     pixels.   Most of the code for this editor has come  straight 
     from  the sprite editor (EDSPR) and thus this  program  looks 
     and  'feels'  very similar to that editor,  and I  will  only 
     point out the differences from it in these instructions.

          Blocks  are created and edited on the 'GRID',  which  is 
     4x4 blocks in size,  and then moved into the block store.   A 
     map can then be created from these blocks on the seperate map 
     editing screen.


2.0  HAVE A DRAG

          See EDSPR documentation.


3.0  SCREEN LAYOUT - EDITOR

          See EDSPR documentation.


3.1  SCREEN LAYOUT - MAP MODE

     The  map editor screen is layed out in the following  fashion 
     ...

     0000000000000000000000        0 - map display
     0000000000000000000000        1 - map position
     0000000000000000000000        2 - map controls
     0000000000000000000000        3 - map pointers
     0000000000000000000000        4 - global controls
     0000000000000000000000        5 - block position
     0000000000000000000000        6 - block controls
                                   7 - block pointers
     1111 2222 3333333 4444        8 - block display
                       4444        9 - text messages
     55 666666 7777777 4444

     8888888888888888888888

     9999999999999999999999


     Here  are further details of what each area of the screen  is 
     used for.

     0 -  This  area  shows the area of the  map  currently  being 
          worked upon.   If the map size is smaller than this area 
          then the map is displayed in the bottom left hand corner 
          of the area.

     1 -  This shows the current position of the bottom  left-hand 
          corner of the map.

     2 -  These are the icons for moving around the map.

     3 -  These are the two map position  pointers,  corresponding 
          in  use  to the workspace pointers in  the  sprite/block 
          editor.

     4 -  These  are  the icons for functions to do  with  editing 
          the map.

     5 -  This shows the current position in block store.

     6 -  These are the icons for moving around block store.

     7 -  And if you hadn't guessed,  these are the block position 
          pointers carried over from the block editing screen.

     8 -  The block display.   To put blocks on to the map,  click 
          on a block in this area and then click on the places  on 
          the  map  display where you want to  put  it;   to  quit 
          plotting click the right mouse button.

     9 -  This area holds the editor name/version,  help messages, 
          and  the size of the map.   The figures displayed  here, 
          and those used when defining the map size on the  editor 
          screen are -1, i.e. 0-255 corresponds to sizes of 1-256.


4.0  DRAGGING IMAGES

          See EDSPR documentation.


5.0  ICON FUNCTIONS

          See EDSPR documentation (ha-ha!).


6.0  FILE FORMATS

     *.BLK -

          The  file  consists of a 128 byte header followed  by  a 
     number of 128 byte blocks.

          The header is constructed as follows ...

     (All entries are of word length unless specified.)

     +00  2 character  string  denoting the   file version number, 
          currently '01'.
     +02  16 word colour palette in XBIOS SET_PALETTE format.
     +34  Palette flag, 0=all 4 bit-planes, 1=clear plane 0, etc.
     +36  Current foreground ink
     +38  Current background ink
     +40  Reserved - 0
     +42  Block position pointer #0
     +44  Block position pointer #1
     +46  Block position pointer #2 (first frame of sequence)
     +48  Block position pointer #3 (last frame of sequence)
     +50  Current block position
     +52  Fat pixel mode flag, 0=off, 1=on
     +54  Cursor style (0,2,4,6),  a  dot cursor or  a  cross-hair 
          cursor with or without outline.
     +56  Reserved - 0
     +58  Reserved - 0
     +60  Reserved - 0
     +62  Number of blocks saved in the file (blank blocks at  the 
          end of the 256 block store are not saved in the file)
     +64  Reserved - 64 bytes of 0

          There then follows the data for the blocks,  each stored 
     as 16 lines from the top to the bottom,  each line stored  in 
     the same format as the ST's lo-res screen.


     *.MAP -

          The  file consists of a 128 byte header followed by  the 
     map data.

          The header is constructed as follows ...

     (All entries are of word length unless specified.)

     +00  2 character  string  denoting the   file version number, 
          currently '01'.
     +02  Map X size in blocks (1-256)
     +04  Map Y size in blocks (1-256)
     +06  Map position pointer #0 X
     +08  Map position pointer #0 Y
     +10  Map position pointer #1 X
     +12  Map position pointer #1 Y
     +14  Current map position X
     +16  Current map position Y
     +18  Reserved - 110 bytes of 0

          The map is stored as lines of bytes from the left to the 
     right, from the bottom line to the top line.
7.0  REVISION HISTORY

     1.0  First 'release' version.
     1.1  Line and circle draw function added.
     1.2  Bug when map size >32k fixed.
     1.3  Ability  to  copy map to back-screen and also  save  the 
          back-screen to disk.   Insert and delete block  function 
          made to change the map data accordingly.
     1.4  Ability to replace all occurances of a block in the  map 
          and also the use of a new front-panel screen.
     1.5  Version number skipped to keep pace with EDSPR.
     1.6  Ability to re-colour files into the current colour set.
     1.7  Fat pixel mode at last.
     1.8  Map re-size is now non-destructive.
     1.9  File delete and default file extensions.
     1.10 Format disc function added.

----

        ELMER'S ATARI ST SPRITE EDITOR (EDSPR) VERSION 2.1

                       CRYPTIC INSTRUCTIONS
1.0  WHAT YOU GET FOR YOUR MONEY

          This editor is designed for creating animated  sequences 
     of  sprites of up to 64x64 pixels in the ST's low  resolution 
     16-colour mode.  Limited support for sprites up to 192x192 is 
     available  by chaining together a number of individual  64x64 
     images.   The grabber supports sprites of up to 320x200  when 
     grabbing from an ST screen.

          Sprites  are created and edited as images on the  'GRID' 
     and then stored in the 'WORKSPACE'.   This workspace holds up 
     to  64  images.   A sprite grabber is provided  to  take  the 
     finished animation sequences and put them into a more  usable 
     form for the programmer.  The grabber allows a table of up to 
     255 sprites to be created, with each individual sprite having 
     its  own width and height,  the option of masking  data,  and 
     from 1 to 4 bit-planes.

          Suggestions  for additional functions and/or changes  to 
     the way the current ones work are welcome, provided that ...

     a) they are written (without too much expletive),
     b) they are not given to me on a Monday,
     c) they are co-signed by the Pope or James Anderton.


2.0  HAVE A DRAG

          The  rubber-box  and  drag-box  routines  used  in  this 
     program  work slightly differently to either GEM or  the  OCP 
     Art  Studio.   In  this program you click the left  or  right 
     button to start off one of these functions and then click the 
     left button to confirm the operation,  or the right button to 
     abort it.   For example,  in copying an area of a sprite  you 
     use the rubber-box function to define the area.   You firstly 
     click on a starting point,  then move the mouse to define the 
     box  size.   If you press the right button after selecting  a 
     starting  point,  you will be allowed to define  a  different 
     starting point,  or by clicking the right button again,  quit 
     the copy function totally.


3.0  SCREEN LAYOUT - EDITOR

     The  workspace  editor screen is layed out in  the  following 
     fashion ...

     222222222222 3333 4444        0 - text messages
     222222222222 3333 4444        1 - foreground colour's RGB 
     222222222222 3333 4444        2 - edit grid x3 magnification
     222222222222 3333 4444        3 - edit grid x1 magnification
     222222222222                  4 - global control icons
     222222222222 555555555        5 - edit grid control icons
     222222222222 555555555        6 - colour palette
     222222222222                  7 - workspace pointers
     222222222222 666666666        8 - workspace position
     222222222222                  9 - workspace control icons
     222222222222 777777777        A - image in workspace
     222222222222                  B - image in workspace
     222222222222 88 999999
     222222222222
     222222222222 AAAA BBBB
     222222222222 AAAA BBBB
                  AAAA BBBB
     000000000 11 AAAA BBBB


     Here  are further details of what each area of the screen  is 
     used for.

     0 -  This  area  normally holds the editor name  and  version 
          number.  When the GEM file selector box is on the screen 
          during loading/saving this area will show what operation 
          the program thinks you want, i.e. LOAD WORKSPACE.

     1 -  This  gives  the  red,  green and blue  content  of  the 
          currently selected foreground colour.

     2 -  This is the magnified image of the editing grid.  All of 
          the  actual drawing/filling/etc is done with the  cursor 
          in this area.

     3 -  This is the normal-sized image of the editing grid.  The 
          dragging  of  sprites to and from  workspace  uses  this 
          image and not the magnified one.

     4 -  These are the icons for functions to do with loading and 
          saving and other manipulations of workspace.

     5 -  These are the icons for functions to do with the editing 
          grid and colour palette.

     6 -  This is the colour palette itself.   The small bar above 
          the palette indicates the currently selected  foreground 
          colour;  and  the  one  below,  the  currently  selected 
          background colour.

     7 -  These are the four pointers into workspace;  they  allow 
          you to move quickly to previously selected positions  in 
          the workspace.   The last two (joined) pointers are also 
          used  to mark the start and end positions for  animation 
          and block operations.

     8 -  This is the number of the current position in workspace.

     9 -  These  are the icons for moving the current position  in 
          workspace.

     A -  This is the image stored at the current position.

     B -  And  this is the next image.   A blank image  is  stored 
          after the end of the workspace, so that when the current 
          position  is the end of workspace,  shown at  'A',  then 
          this area will always show a blank.


3.1  SCREEN LAYOUT - GRABBER

     The  sprite  grabber  screen is layed out  in  the  following 
     fashion ...

     222222222222 3333 4444        0 - text messages
     222222222222 3333 4444        1 - sprite table size
     222222222222 3333 4444        2 - grab grid x3 magnification
     222222222222 3333 4444        3 - grab grid x1 magnification
     222222222222      4444        4 - global control icons
     222222222222 5555 4444        5 - orgin movement icons
     222222222222                  6 - grab box position and size
     222222222222 666666666        7 - colour palette
     222222222222                  8 - sprite control icons
     222222222222 777777777        9 - workspace pointers
     222222222222                  A - sprite position
     222222222222 8888 9999        B - workspace position
     222222222222   88             C - workspace control icons
     222222222222 A 88 B CC        D - sprite
     222222222222                  E - workspace
     222222222222 DDDD EEEE
     222222222222 DDDD EEEE
                  DDDD EEEE
     00000000 111 DDDD EEEE


     Here  are further details of what each area of the screen  is 
     used for.

     0 -  This  area  normally holds the editor name  and  version 
          number.  When the GEM file selector box is on the screen 
          during loading/saving this area will show what operation 
          the program thinks you want, i.e. LOAD WORKSPACE.

     1 -  This  gives  the  current size of the  sprite  table  in 
          bytes.

     2 -  This is the magnified image of the grabbing grid.   What 
          is shown here is the current workspace image modified by 
          the  current  setting of the 'KILL  COLOR  BIT'  option.  
          Sprites  are grabbed off here and stored as 3 or 4  bit-
          planes depending upon the setting of that control.

     3 -  This  is  the normal-sized image of the  grabbing  grid.  

     4 -  These  are  the icons for functions to do  with  editing 
          that still apply in the grabber.

     5 -  These are the icons for moving the 'ORIGIN'.  The origin 
          is  provided so that when saving parts of an  image,  or 
          whole sequences of images,  a common reference point can 
          be set up to help the programmer work out where to  plot 
          these  sprites in a game.   These icons are also  active 
          during the 'ANIMATE' function.

     6 -  This  area  displays either the current setting  of  the 
          origin,  or  the position and size of the  grabbing  box 
          relative to that origin, depending upon what the program 
          thinks you are trying to do.

     7 -  This  is  the colour palette,  modified by  the  current 
          setting of the 'KILL COLOR BIT' option.

     8 -  These  are the controls for moving around  and  deleting 
          sprites from the sprite store.

     9 -  These are the current settings of the animation sequence 
          pointers.   They  are for reference only and  cannot  be 
          modified in the grabber.

     A -  This is your position in the sprite store.

     B -  This is your position in the workspace.

     C -  These are the icons for moving around the workspace.

     D -  This is the sprite stored at the current position in the 
          sprite store.

     E -  This is the image stored at the current position in  the 
          workspace.


4.0  DRAGGING IMAGES

          Images are moved between the edit grid and workspace  by 
     'dragging' them.   This is done by clicking the left or right 
     mouse button on the sprite you wish to move,  (at which point 
     a  box  will appear around the sprite) and  then  moving  the 
     mouse  to  where  you want the image to  go,  (with  the  box 
     automatically  following) and then clicking the mouse  button 
     again.   In  this  way  images can be  moved  between  screen 
     sections 3,  A,  and B.   The workspace pointers can also  be 
     used as either the source or destination of such a move, with 
     the  image  going to/coming from the  workspace  position  as 
     displayed by that pointer.  The workspace pointers themselves 
     are altered by dragging the current position pointer  (screen 
     section  8) to one of them;  similarly the  current  position 
     pointer  can  be  altered by dragging one  of  the  workspace 
     pointers to it.


5.0  ICON FUNCTIONS

          These functions are all labelled and  explained,  albeit 
     tersely  by  the on-screen help facility.


6.0  FILE FORMATS

     *.WRK -

          There  are  two different versions of  the  '.WRK'  file 
     format.   In  both versions the file consists of a  128  byte 
     HEADER  followed by a number of 2048 byte  IMAGES;  the  only 
     difference between the versions is in the header.

          The HEADER is constructed as follows ...

     (All entries are of word length unless specified.)

     Version 1 ...

     +00  2 character string denoting the version number '01'.
     +02  16 word colour palette in XBIOS SET_PALETTE format.
     +34  Palette flag, 0=all 4 bit-planes, 1=clear plane 0, etc.
     +36  Current foreground ink
     +38  Current background ink
     +40  Animation speed (delay count actually)
     +42  Workspace position pointer #0
     +44  Workspace position pointer #1
     +46  Workspace position pointer #2 (first frame of sequence)
     +48  Workspace position pointer #3 (last frame of sequence)
     +50  Current workspace position
     +52  X origin offset (0-63)
     +54  Y origin offset (0-63)
     +56  Fat pixel mode flag, 0=off, 1=on
     +58  Cursor style (0,2,4,6),  a  dot cursor or  a  cross-hair 
          cursor with or without outline.
     +60  Reserved - 0
     +62  Reserved - 0
     +64  64 byte bitmap, 1 bit for each of 512 possible workspace 
          images (the current editor only recognizes the first  64 
          entries).  The bit is set if that image is stored in the 
          file,  with byte 0 bit 7 representing workspace position 
          0,  onwards  to  byte  7 bit  0  representing  workspace 
          position 63.

     Version 2 ...

     +00  2 character string denoting version number '02'.
     +02  16 word colour palette in XBIOS SET_PALETTE format.
     +34  Palette flags  (2 bytes),  the current settings for  the 
          flags  to  be stored in the sprite data (see  version  3 
          '.SPR' file format below).
     +36  Current foreground ink
     +38  Current background ink
     +40  Animation speed (delay count actually)
     +42  Workspace position pointer #0
     +44  Workspace position pointer #1
     +46  Workspace position pointer #2 (first frame of sequence)
     +48  Workspace position pointer #3 (last frame of sequence)
     +50  Current workspace position
     +52  X origin offset (0-63)
     +54  Y origin offset (0-63)
     +56  Fat pixel mode flag, 0=off, 1=on
     +58  Cursor style (0,2,4,6),  a  dot cursor or  a  cross-hair 
          cursor with or without outline.
     +60  Reserved - 0
     +62  Reserved - 0
     +64  32 byte bitmap, 1 bit for each of 256 possible workspace 
          images (the current editor only recognizes the first  64 
          entries).  The bit is set if that image is stored in the 
          file,  with byte 0 bit 7 representing workspace position 
          0,  onwards  to  byte  7 bit  0  representing  workspace 
          position 63.
     +96  ???


          The IMAGES are stored as follows ...

          The data for each of the images stored in the file (i.e. 
     the  1  bits in the bitmap) are  stored  contiguously.   Each 
     image is stored as 64 lines from the top to the bottom,  with 
     each  line  stored  in the same format  as  the  ST's  lo-res 
     screen.


     *.SPR -

          There are three different versions of the '.SPR'  format 
     files.  In versions '01' and '02' the format was designed for 
     use particularly with the ST,  with version '02' being only a 
     rearrangement  of version '01' in order to keep the users  of 
     Ocean's in-house development system happy.   Version 3 is the 
     current  version,  designed  to  be  applicable  across  many 
     different computers.

          The  file  consists of a HEADER,  followed by  an  INDEX 
     TABLE  with an entry for each sprite saved,  followed by  the 
     DATA BLOCK containing the actual data for the sprites.


          The HEADER is constructed as follows ...

     (All entries are of word length unless specified.)

     Version 1 ...

     There is an 8 byte header.

     +00  2  character  string denoting the file  version  number, 
          '01'.
     +02  Number of sprites saved (0=none).
     +04  Data size (total file size - header size). (LONG)

     Version 2 ...

     There is an 8 byte header.

     +00  2  character  string denoting the file  version  number, 
          '02'.
     +02  Data size (total file size - header size). (LONG)
     +06  Number of sprites saved (0=none).

     Version 3 ...

     There is an 8 byte header.

     +00  1 character denoting the machine type; currently defined 
          types are '0' for the ST, and '1' for the Amiga. (BYTE)
     +01  1 character denoting the version number, '3'. (BYTE)
     +02  Data size (total file size - header size). (LONG)
     +06  Number of sprites saved (0=none).


          The INDEX TABLE is constructed as follows ...

     Versions 1 and 2 ...

     For each sprite saved there is an 8 byte entry.

     +00  Palette  flag,  0 if 4 bit-planes are saved,  or 1-4  if 
          bit-plane 0-3 is missing.
     +02  Stored X size - 1. (BYTE)
     +03  Stored Y size - 1. (BYTE)
     +04  Offset from start of sprite data to this sprite's  data. 
          (LONG)

     Version 3 ...

     For each sprite saved there is an 8 byte entry.

     +00  Extra  flags.  Bit  7 is set to  indicate  that  masking 
          information  is  stored in the data.  Bit 6  is  set  to 
          indicate that a blank extra word is stored at the end of 
          each  line of the mask/data in order to  facilitate  the 
          generation of pre-shifted sprites. Bit 0 is the high bit 
          of  the  X size,  allowing sprites of up to  512  pixels 
          wide. Bits 1-5 are reserved for future use. (BYTE)
     +01  Bit-plane   flags,   bits  0-7  represent  whether   the 
          corresponding bit-plane appears in the data. (BYTE)
     +02  Stored X size - 1. (BYTE)
     +03  Stored Y size - 1. (BYTE)
     +04  Offset from start of sprite data to this sprite's  data. 
          (LONG)


          The DATA BLOCK is constructed as follows ...

     Versions 1 and 2 ...

          The  data  block  contains the  data  for  each  sprite, 
     arranged contiguously;  i.e. the data for sprite 1 follows on 
     directly  after  the data for sprite 0.   The data  for  each 
     sprite image is stored in rows, from the bottom of the sprite 
     to  the top.   Each row of the sprite is stored from left  to 
     right.   The  pixels in each row are stored in blocks  of  16 
     pixels like the ST's low-res screen, with each block starting 
     with  a mask word,  and followed by 3 or 4 words of data  (as 
     given  by  the  palette flag).   Where the sprite  is  not  a 
     multiple of 16 pixels wide, the data is padded out to the end 
     of the word.  The mask word contains a '0' bit for each pixel 
     of valid data.

     Version 3 ...

          The  format of the data block depends upon  the  machine 
     type  given in the file header.
          In type '0' files (for the ST) the data is arranged  the 
     same  as  for version 0 files.
          In  type  '1' files (for the Amiga) the  data  for  each 
     sprite  is arranged as seperate bit-planes,  with all of  the 
     data for a single mask or data bit-plane stored contiguously, 
     followed  by all the data for the next bit-plane.   The  mask 
     plane contains a '1' bit for each pixel of valid data.


7.0  REVISION HISTORY

     1.0  First 'release'.
     1.1  Grabber altered to blank out parts of a sprite that have 
          been grabbed. 
     1.2  Magnify  source  image  during  a  COPY  AREA  from  the 
          workspace.
     1.3  Line and circle draw functions added to the editor.
     1.4  Ability  to copy workspace to back screen and also  save 
          the back-screen to disk.
     1.5  Minor re-arrangement to .SPR file header (version  '01') 
          and use of a new front-panel screen compatible with both 
          EDSPR and EDMAP.   
     1.6  Ability to re-colour files into the current colour set.
     1.7  Sprite  grabber  can grab large sprites  from  the  back 
          screen.
     1.8  File delete and default file extensions added.
     1.9  Grabber delete sprite bug found and fixed.
     1.10 Format disc function added.

     2.0  First  major revision.   Minor changes to the  operation 
          and  layout  of the icons.   Major  changes  in  editing 
          flexibility.
     2.1  More minor changes. Ability to read 16 colour IFF files.

----

       ELMER'S ATARI ST MAP PROCESSOR (COMPUTE) VERSION 1.3

                UNBELIEVABLY CRYPTIC INSTRUCTIONS
1.0  WHAT YOU GET FOR YOUR MONEY

          This  program has been designed to take a map file  that 
     has been produced by 'EDMAP' and scan through it to determine 
     which  blocks appear next to each other (for use in  shifted-
     block  scrolling).   As well as the processed map  and  block 
     list  that are written to disk,  the program  can  optionally 
     produce  print-outs of the block list in a variety of  useful 
     formats.

 
2.0  FILE FORMATS

     *.MAP -

          The  file consists of a 128 byte header followed by  the 
     map data.

          The header is constructed as follows ...

     (All entries are of word length unless specified.)

     +00  2 character  string  denoting the   file version number, 
          currently '01'.
     +02  Map X size in blocks (1-256)
     +04  Map Y size in blocks (1-256)
     +06  Map position pointer #0 X
     +08  Map position pointer #0 Y
     +10  Map position pointer #1 X
     +12  Map position pointer #1 Y
     +14  Current map position X
     +16  Current map position Y
     +18  Reserved - 110 bytes of 0

          The map is stored as lines of bytes from the left to the 
     right, from the bottom line to the top line.


     *.DAT -

          The  file consists of a 10 byte header followed  by  two 
     variably sized blocks of data.

          The header is constructed as follows ...

     (All entries are of word length unless specified.)

     +0   Long-word  header  of $00000000 if 8-bit  map  data,  or 
          $FFFFFFFF if 16-bit map data.
     +4   Number of shifted blocks
     +6   Map width in blocks
     +8   Map height in blocks

          Then  follows  the processed copy of  the  original  map 
     using the new shifted-block numbers.   If the WRAP option  is 
     set then the map will wrap correctly otherwise the last block 
     on each line is just a repeat of the previous block.  The map 
     can be saved using either byte or word entries.

     +A   Map data

          Then follows the shifted block list.   Each entry in the 
     list  is comprised of the original block numbers of  the  LHS 
     and  RHS  blocks,  1  byte  each.   The  shifted  blocks  are 
     numerically  sorted  into  ascending  order,   to  facilitate 
     collision detection.

     +n   Shifted block list

Ads - Fudd-Ed

Fudd-Ed Atari ad

Trivia - Fudd-Ed

Ocean Software's internal sprite editor written for Atari ST development system. Includes EDWRK / EDSPR sprite-editor, EDMAP map-editor and in later releases COMPUTE map processor. Release 3.0 is the last known version with a title EDWRK.

It was used at least for WEC LeMans (ZX Spectrum), Chase HQ (ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC), Batman The Movie, Operation Wolf, Rambo III (16-bits) and others.

If you look at the Ocean games disks with unpacked file extensions SPR, WRK, BLK and MAP you can actually load up and edit sprite and gamemap data with this editor.


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